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20121120
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayl emplo russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayemploye russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todaymployee russia is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayployee a is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayloyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayoyee i is still a good place to invest. >> a lot of cross border deals. is the environment todayyee i f still a good place to in more or less friendly? >> there is no compare ton. when mr. putin came in, he changed the tax code which made a huge difference.ie ton. when mr. putin came in, he changed the tax code which made a huge difference. it was 13% flat tax, corporation tax 24% and suddenly you couldn't invest in companies because could you understand what was in the financials of the company. so accounting firms g
charged three more people over the deep water horizon accident. this from environment and energy news. the justice department charged three workers involved in the deepwater horizon with various criminal violations. dd go down to amarillo, texas, merlin is waiting on the independent line. you're on the "washington journal." caller: i was just wondering how much b.p. has actually made cleaning up the spill? host: not a stat i have for you right now, merlin. i can tell you b.p. was reporting profits in the fourth quarter of 2010 after the spill occurred. profits of about $5.5 billion. the spill occurred in the summer of that year. this according to b.p.'s website. in the third quarter of 2010, b.p.'s profits were about $5 billion. in the fourth quarter of 2011, $7.6 billion in profits. caller: does anybody think that they might have did it on purpose? host: why would you think that, merlin? caller: well, because i heard that the night right before the spill they pulled out their stocks in a lot of, you know, some of the money that they had out there, they pulled out -- host: where are y
with training, and you have to create an environment where you understand that is going to happen and it is not necessarily a career injured. we are working on it. it is absolutely essential that we do. when i came in, we notice that 70's are of our public diplomacy dollars were spent on a demographic over the age of 35. we said looking at the world, the fact is that you have a far better opportunity of planting the seeds with a younger demographic which is what i was so supportive of the program. he said it is so it difficult when you wreach those. when you're younger you have an ability to do that. if we can have a good conversation with a young girl in pakistan she will be able to change the perception of the united states in a way that we never could. it is the wisest testament not just for the future but for whitright now. >> we have a clash of technology in future. it is going to play out. she came across this egypt influenced network. if you google it, it is this blob of blue, red, purple circles. to the blue are people tweeted in english. the right people in arabic. the pu
analysis in both hard copy, open source, classified, and the cyber environment, to inform these said policy-makers and defenders of the cyber threat. there are four big players -- dhs, responsible for the u.s. infrastructure in terms of how we are protecting our homeland. the fbi does have the law enforcement peace. those here this morning and know exactly why they have that. nsa, also known as cyber command, has the cyber command to drive the entire structure and the policies by which we are going to deploy various networks around the world. cia doesn't do that work but we can't do our work without collaborating am working with each of them. despite the fact that sometimes the matter what the news says, you do not do this alone. we do it with all our partners in the public and private sector. cia does partner with our agencies. we do, i heard a lot about for each of you, you talked about co-ops, internships, opportunities. the partner with these agencies to leverage our own employees and prospective employees to get the best match for the person. we are investing in the future and the futu
not to destroy the world's environment, which they will do if other things being equal. and so we want to work with them on avoiding environmental just destruction. we want them to continue bringing people from rural poverty to sort of urban working classness, which is what they've been doing. we want them to grow up in both international and domestic ways. grow up internationally in having a foreign policy that's not just whatever's good for them commercially, which is what their foreign policy is now. and to say, "okay, you have to play a role in iran and syria or whatever, being responsible." domestically, we want them to gain confidence so they don't have to have their foot on their people's neck. most of the time in china you don't know the government's around. just kind of a sort of state of chaos -- >> really? >> and, yeah. >> i mean, not like russia, the soviet union -- >> oh, it's -- >> not that blanket -- >> entirely different. it's most of the time the areas the government cares about, the internet, democratic protest or whatever, taiwan, tibet, they're all over. when it doesn't inv
that climate change has little to do with the state of the environment, but much to do with the state of capitalism and transforming the american economic system and you see an opening with sandy, right? >> i do see an opening because, you know, whenever you have this kind of destruction there has to be a reconstruction and what i documented in the shock doctrine is that these right-wing think tanks leak the american enterprise institute and the cato institute and heritage foundation, they historically have gotten very, very good at seizing these moments of opportunity to push through their wish lists of policies and often their wish lists of policies, after hurricane katrina there was a meeting at the heritage foundation just two weeks after the storm hit. parts of the city were still under water and there was a meeting and "the wall street journal" reported from it and the heading was 31 free market solutions for hurricane katrina and you go down the list and it was -- don't re-open the public schools. replace the public schools with vouchers and drill for oil in anwar and the arcti
're talking with mike magner, the "national journal" energy and environment managing editor. he's also got this terrific book called poisoned legacy, great read about bp's rise to power. bp both on how they handled the gulf coast spill but also some other things in their record. mike, how bad are things in the coast right now? >> oh, boy, there is a long way to go on the cleanup. bp spilled an estimated five million barrels of oil into the gulf and in addition to a lot of natural gas that leaked and then when they were trying to clean it up, they used all of these dispersants, these chemicals that have really never been used on that scale. they cleaned up a lot of it by burning some of it off the surface and scrubbing what landed on the beaches but i talked yesterday to people in louisiana who say that there's still at least a million barrels out there. some of it is in wetlands in louisiana that's really difficult to clean up. and some of it -- because of the dispersants is still floating around out there. in particles and at
of $15 a barrel oil by 2025. in terms of prices, we're talking about in the environment similar to today's, maybe slightly worse, in order to hit those and provide incentive to hit those will targets and also to dampen demand. that is part of the iaea calculus. you have both the production and demand side. an order for us to even in part a modest amount and get to that point requires a major steps forward in fuel efficiency. host: so who is benefiting the most? guest: the middle east continues to benefit tremendously. opec countries share a global connection forecast to go up -- production forecast to go up to nearly half of world oil supplies. the middle east remains a big beneficiary. the u.s. will be better off in those terms than it would be without this increase will bring production. we will be keeping more money at home. oil makes up about two-thirds of our trade deficit now. that number will decline. oil companies that do very well with higher prices will continue to do very well. host: back to the idea of shale gas. you mentioned some parts of the country where this is happening
school. the goal is to emphasize the need for safer school environments. >>> local government leaders, students, teachers and local religious leaders are working to reduce teen smoking. today they're going to join the healthcare coalition for all in annapolis to ask for a $1 increase. three cigarette taxes have reduced smoking by 32% in the state of maryland. that is more than double the current national average. >>> you voted to expand gambling, now you're going to find out exactly what that means. this morning maryland casinos are going to be offering plans for table games and 24-hour gaming. they're expected to address the reconfiguration of the casino floor to help accommodate those new games, the creation of 1200 jobs and introduce a dealer training school. officials will also talk about the impact this could have on future tax revenues for the state of maryland. >>> time now for a check of that forecast once again. lynette is here with us. you talked about the changes that were coming. this was on friday and into monday. you have certainly held up your end of the deal. >> i lo
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> another keeping them honest rosht, why was president obama kept in the dark about cia director david petraeus' affair with paula broadwell until after the election. attorney general eric holder knew in late summer of at fair. that information according to the white house was never passed until months later. consider this, the director of the c.i.a. was having an extramarital affair, communicating with his mistress via an unsecure e-mail account and potentially putting national security at risk. obama was asked about the investigation today during the news conference. >> i am withholding judgment. with respect to how the entire process surrounding general petraeus came up. we don't have all of the information yet. but i want to say that i have a lot of confidence generally in the fbi and they have a difficult job. and so i'm going to wait and see. >> the white house says there are protocols, that's the word they used, that must be followed when notifying the white house about the
. what's different about this situation versus four years ago is the entire regional environment has changed. you have got a civil war going on in syria, you've got protests going on in jordan, you've got unrest along the israeli -- gyp shan border. you've got iran close to a nuclear weapon. >> how important is the relationship right now between president obama and president morsi in egypt? >> it will be critical. and as the president said in the advance of the election, he's neither at the point friend or foe. morsi has a very difficult delicate political charge, his party, the freedom of justice party comes out of the muslim brotherhood, they have an affinity with hamas. and president morsi is after his own challenges, getting his economy back on track, he's going to need significant support from the united states, the president and the congress. he's got different constituencies pulling him in opposite directions. >> to wolf in jerusalem, we all know the relationship between president obama and mr. netanyahu was challenging for the last four years. but now how much influence do yo
programs and environments where military and civilian leaders get a chance to share information. one thing we intentionally do is 101. our military fellows actually explain the military to the nonmilitary fellows. our doctors do a healthcare 101. so they become the experts in their field and share with each other. which is really incredible. but the military civilian piece is something a lot of these leaders do not get exposed to. both the military leaders as well as the civilian so for a couple of days every year, we often go on an aircraft carrier and really understand what happens on an aircraft carrier. it is really an incredible environment of learning. >> bill: right. so now as i understand, unlike candace, do you have a job to go back to. >> i will continue my training. and i'm looking forward to finishing it. at the end of those two years really is -- at the end of my training, i make a decision on how to enter the practice of medicine and really, if i will have an opportunity to have a large component de
environment, and taxes is one of them. reform the tax code. when you do that, you get more revenue. guaranteed almost. i mean, it's, again, it's as i said earlier, there's opportunities here, and this is an opportunity for us as a country, and as you look at the budget analysis, joint tax committee analysis of what tax reform could be in terms of economic and growth, i mean, all of them will lead to more growth whether it's corporate tax reform or individual tax reform. >> right, but if the president insists, said last friday, he said this was fought over in the campaign, and we fought over tax rates, rising tax rates, he didn't use the word "rates" himself, but the press secretary said the president would veto any bill that extends tax rates. if he insists rates go up for those making over $250,000, what would your recommendation be to the republican congress in the senate? >> working in two white houses, i believe a president has a veto over the press secretary, thank goodness, because i like the president's comments better than jay carney's comments. i think he was behind the curve on that,
and assurances to make sure your operating in a safe and secure environment are in place. those other things you are not doing begin to recognize, you start doing. that again, those of the weakness as reported at those 24 agencies other than the intelligence community. now, if you look at, and this is again the gao data, these are computer incidents reported from 2006 through 2011. you can see there has been a 700% increase in that from 5000 incidents up to 45,000 incidents per year. that is just those that have been reported and detected. many incidents go on that are not detected. when we are talking about cyber security and cyber warfare and cyber attacks we have incidents that pops up from time to time and hit the news. we all read about them, but in the event there is a true systemic cyber attack it would go after all of our systems, all of our vulnerability iies. much of we see here is probing -- in the old civil war days when they sent a scout out to detect where the enemy was. that is happening in the cyberworld. many of these are just probes to sea, are these militias intrusions been de
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an automatic resignation? maybe there would be in the current environment. i can't tell anymore what the standards are sometimes. >> well, you know, i don't know. >> i mean it. >> i doubt that. i think you're probably right. and certainly it doesn't apply to members of congress, but they're elected officials and these are appointed officials. the fbi basically says we decided to tell the dni, the director of national intelligence james clapper, when we were all done what happened here because we thought he should know as in essence a personnel matter. under the new system the director of the cia reports to clapper. clapper is his boss, and they thought that clapper should know. he controls the security clearances. let him make the significance about whether it was proper to keep david petraeus on the job. obviously clapper felt it wasn't and told petraeus he ought to resign. >> i guess it's one of those cases once people know about it, the catch-22 is you have to do something about it or else you're part of the cover-up. maybe that's the way they look at it. pete williams, as always,
says much of the money bp has agreed to pay will be used to restore the environment in the gulf. we'll be right back with a tense exchange that just took place with some developing news actually in a hearing on the benghazi attacks. we'll play that for us right after this quick break. d also cs by making it without 100% real cheddar cheese. but then...it wouldn't be stouffer's mac & cheese. just one of over 70 satisfying recipes for one from stouffer's. a wit takes some doing.sn't just happen. some coordinating. and a trip to the one place with the new ideas that help us pull it all together. from the things that hang and shine... ...to the things that sparkle and jingle. all while saving the things that go in our wallet. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. create a musical light show with the maestro mouse voice- activated ornament. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't kno
energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> back to "hardball." now to the "sideshow." how is mitt romney dealing with his election loss? well, david letterman has been compiling some coping mechanisms all involving a so-called pretend president romney. >> today mitt romney boug
there was a sense on issues like injury and the environment. they had a vision where we have competition in places like china, germany and india. if we are going to have a thriving american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in the new technology industries of the future and i think that plays an important role. you know the obama vision was one where they thought better suited the country. and there is no question on social issues. whether it is women's health care, immigration, gay rights. there are a set of issues particularly for younger voters so, people vote very, very carefully. the economy was a dominant issue. i think that is why ultimately some people chose the president to continue the journey we are on. now quickly in terms of democracy, you know we don't know this for sure, but we could be seeing very different elections. that of that in 2010, 14, maybe 18 will be quite a bit different. the comments i made two years ago were predicated on what we thought would happen in a presidential year. the latino turnout was surging. president winning more of the latino vo
to day livelihood in plays like west virginia, louisiana. while their environment is being destroyed, if you think about louisiana as a state that is being literally destroyed by the industry that employs a good number of the people there. so every mechanism in that state is designed to protect an industry that's destroying the state. but people as real lives are tied to it. even democrats, someone like jay rockefeller who is considered a great prerogative when it comes to coal, he's are with the republicans. >> anyone who is going to be elected -- there are certain places where it's the geographic interests override the ideological ones. >> that's why is we need some actually leadership from the president, and others on the really central issues. i mean, look, climate change is the legacy issue of all legacy issues. you know, 100 years from now, the only thing that people are going to look back on 2012 and care about. the fiscal cliff or the -- it's like, you guys the arctic melts and you didn't do anything about it? why is that? >> keystone is one pipeline. the canadian company is
, as does my environment just by nature. so the book is very much about our landscape, how we perceive it as fascinating in our youth and how over time it changes. the same substance -- stone, rock, water, wood -- go from being the unknown, worthy of curiosity, to at some point being a threat. and the natural defiance of us living our lives, which is in defiance of our mortality all the way from childhood where we're immortal to our elder years where we become the thing that holds so many people we've lost and is what survives. memory is what survives. and within that memory the afterlife of so much. so thank you. [applause] >> good afternoon. i'd also like to thank the organizers of the miami book fair for having me. when i started writing my book a year or two ago, i certainly did not expect i would end up here or seated on a panel with these gentlemen. i think what we've heard so far is that a lot of war stories represent a need to explain. why was there an outpost where there should never have been an outpost? what's the context within my own war experience? who was i before i went
sorts of things. but also along with training them, you have to create an institution and environment were you see guys going to happen and it's not necessarily a career ender when it happened. but we are working on it and i think we've gotten better because it's absolutely essential that we do. briefly in the demographics, one of the things i noticed was about 70% are public diplomacy dollars were spent if you do it demographically on an over the age we flipped out because looking at the world and the way it is, the fact of the matter is you have a far better opportunity employment being a planting seeds of the younger demographic, paul said it is difficult when someone reaches 40, 50, 62 change their perception of their ideas. when they are younger you have an ability to do it. if we can have a good conversation with a young girl in pakistan, 15 or 16 years old, she will be able to change the perception of the united states and her family and her community and away we never could. so it's a wise estimate, not just for the future, but frankly for right now. >> so with a clash of tech
countries that have more competitive environment and taxes are one of them. yes, we have to reform the tax code. when you do that, i will get more revenue. it is guaranteed. again, sort of as i was talking about earlier. this is opportunities here. this is opportunity for us as a country. if you look at the congressional budget analysis and joint tax committee analysis, what tax reform could mean in terms of macroeconomic impact and growth, all will lead to more growth, whether corporate tax reform or individual tax reform. >> right but if the president insists as he did last friday, this was fought over in the campaign and, fought over tax rates, rising tax rates, he didn't ice the words rates himself but jay carney, the white house press secretary said the president will veto any bill that extends the current tax rates. if he insists that tax rates go up for those making over $250,000, what's, what would your recommendation be to the republican congress and senate? >> first having worked in two white houses i believe a president does have a veto over the press secretary. thank goodness b
the way we govern our country. it is a good, therapeutic way to look in a nonhostile environment as to where we need to go with the country. >> john: the fact it is a nonhostile environment means it won't be covered on most cable news outlets. i'm looking over the roster of speakers. of course you're there as well as james carvel and mary madeline. i guess their merge is a model for this kind of event. you have trent lott and ted strickland, jonathan capehart and another married couple, avalon and hoover. it seems like a really, really inspiring roster of people. so i guess let me ask you why did things turn out the way they did last week on election day? >> you know, first of all, it was close but i think that -- you know, most of the pundits got it right. that is i think the people sense that the economy was getting better while slowly things were kind of turning in the right direction. and i think they were willing to give the president the benefit of the doubt under those circumstances. i also think that the
document. the job of government is to provide an environment in which our citizens can live their lives knowing that they will not be subject to nefarious actions by others. in the case of the farmers and ranchers, the terrible stories, thousands of stories like this that the chairman described. there was a failure of government to protect these people, and the results of this investigation, fulfilling congress' obligation to oversight, tell us we have many opportunities to improve and provide better protection, and these opportunities run the gamut from following the behavior of those who are in charge at entities like mf global to monitoring and modifying the ways in which the rating agencies do their business, do their job. there have been so many failures in so many ways, not only at an f global, but at other similar stories in recent history. one common strand seems to be that we need to provide our regulators with better tools to pursue the enforcement of law that existed prior to the massive imposition of dot-franc pit which did not have infinite resources and united states, nor
environmentings. but i don't believe, my gut tells me there wasn't necessarily a breach of classified information in terms of broadwell's access to petraeus. jenna: mike, would you stay with us, we've got to take a quick commercial break, about now the person who is running the cia and our national security now at this point in our nation. o we'll be right back with mike and more "happening now". [ male announcer ] only polaris delivers the ultimate combination of power, suspension and agility. the only trail capable side-by sides, featuring the ultimate value, r 570. the only 4-passenge sport machines, led by the all-new rzr xp 4 and the undisputed king of high performance, rzr xp. razor sharp performance. only from polaris. get huge rebates on 2012's and low financing on all models during the polaris holiday sales event. jenna: mike baker back with us, former cia operative. mike, we wake up this week anew, right? we had one of the most decorated, well respected military officers at the head of our cia at this time last week, and now we don't. who's the temporary guy that's taking control of the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)